Why Kubernetes is Foundational for Fortune 500 Digital Transformation (and the Cloud Infrastructure Management Landscape)

About 18 months ago, tech publications began overflowing with news on containers and how they would radically transform enterprise IT. We set out to distill the hype in this new market by putting together a new series on our blog aptly called "The State of the Container." Based on our research, it became clear that this was a real market trend and represented a once in a decade transformation in enterprise infrastructure that would reshape the entire IT industry.

It was apparent that the container and application layer were only the beginning, and we began investigating where the gaps were – in areas like security, networking, management, and orchestration – to see where we could support the next generation of innovators. We spoke to more than one hundred corporate executives and founders focused on bringing a tidal wave of innovation to the enterprise IT stack, while making two investments along the way: CoreOS & Cockroach Labs. With more of the recent buzz building around Kubernetes, we wanted to take a moment to compare the pros and cons of other platforms, and why we believe Kubernetes will be crown jewel of container orchestration.

Read more

The State of the Container – October

image

The State of the Container curates the top news in the Container ecosystem each month. Sign up for our weekly newsletter to receive these posts via email.

It’s been a whirlwind of new and exciting developments in the container world this past month. First and foremost, Docker acquired Tutum, a platform for deploying and managing containers in the cloud and on-premises. With this acquisition, Docker fills a big gap in their “build, ship, and run” app delivery pipeline for IT Teams, enabling an even better end-to-end solution on the deployment and management side while boosting team collaboration and efficiency. VMWare, not to be left out, is also addressing another critical hole in Docker, security. They’re working on preventing container escalation, and future versions of VMWare’s NSX should allow security admins to apply VM like filtering rules to containers and isolate the container from its physical host. On the startup side, Twistlock and Scalock (which recently raised funding) are also focused on hardening the container and enacting security policies. Lots more to come here, and we’ll be keeping a close eye for promising developments. Other companies that raised funding over the last month include CloudBolt,  Robin Systems and Bracket Computing. Lastly, be sure to check out Greg Taylor’s review of  Quay.io; a tutorial on how to set up Kontena on DigitalOcean; and how you can use the Folding@Home project to use idle capacity on your Docker hosts to help search for a cure for Cancer.

Read more

The State of the Container – September

image

The State of the Container curates the top news in the Container ecosystem each month. Sign up for our weekly newsletter to receive these posts via email.

Welcome back from the summer! The big news in August was Microsoft's preview of Windows Server 2016, which is capable of running Windows Container and will soon be able to run Hyper-V Containers. Rather than exposing a native Windows API for containers, Microsoft chose to support a Docker-compatible API. These developments and their growing partnership with Docker also point to a new Microsoft, one that realizes it must work well and integrate with competing technologies (Linux), rather than building a Windows equivalent. As a comp, Verizon demo'd 50,000 Docker containers launching in 100 seconds on a Verizon cluster powered by Mesophere's DCOS at MesosCon in Seattle in August. In other news, Docker released v1.8, which aims to be the fastest way to get up and running with Docker in Development, and Google’s Container Engine is now out of Beta. We've lined up a bunch of great articles for you below, including 6 Next Gen Monitoring Tools for Docker, a tutorial on developing with Go, and where the current state of container adoption stands.

Read more

The State of the Container – July

image

The State of the Container curates the top news in the Container ecosystem each month. Sign up for our weekly newsletter to receive these posts via email.

Reaching over 500 million downloads this month, Docker celebrated mainstream success at its annual 2-day conference, DockerCon2015, with many exciting keynotes, funding announcements and new partnerships. One of the most climatic moments of the event was when Docker founder and CTO Solomon Hykes and CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi met on stage to shake hands, and announced the launch of the Open Container Project, where everyone who has a stake in building a thriving container ecosystem agreed to work together to ensure common, open and platform-portable standards for software containers. For Docker, this means giving up some control, but it benefits the container ecosystem immensely.

In another major announcement, Docker launched the Docker Trusted Registry (DTR), a piece of software that allows enterprises to run containers securely in public clouds or on premise data centers. IBM, Microsoft and AWS have all stated they will resell the software on their platforms, and Docker has stated that DTR beta has attracted 800 organizations, with more than half of the participating companies in the Fortune 500. Make sure to check out videos from both days of conference if you missed it. In other news, Jérôme Petazzoni gave a great talk at HeavyBit on Lean Containers, and Pachyderm, RancherLabs and Portworx all recently raised venture funding. If you're somehow still new to containers, check out serial entrepreneur and Work-Bench Mentor Dimitri Sirota’s article on what container technology means for the delivery of software. We'll see you in August!

Read more

The State of the Container – June

image

The State of the Container curates the top news in the Container ecosystem each month. Sign up for our weekly newsletter to receive these posts via email.

It’s an interesting time for container technology. While Docker is currently on a quest to become the de-facto standard for containers, CoreOS is making inroads and battling head to head for marketshare. Last month, CoreOS announced AppC – a community developed spec that aims to be composable, secure, decentralized and open industry standard. AppC has gained support from the likes of Google, Apcera, Red Hat and VMware. These formats give power to the customer and there are more pilots / use cases taking place at enterprises than ever before. Ultimately, it will be up to IT to decide which format works best for them. In other news, Docker recently put its security guidelines in writing, Mesosphere’s DCOS is now available on Azure and AWS, and Twistlock emerged out of stealth with $2.5M in funding to tackle container security. Be sure to check out John Willis’ article on applying DevOps principles, Peter Yared’s post on Containers-as-a-Service and Adrian Cockcroft’s slides on the Challenges of Monitoring Microservices and Containers.

Read more